Thursday, 4 March 2010

Toppobrillo TWF Update



Some more examples of the wonderful Toppobrillo Triple Wave Folder.

PotD_Back2Seven  by  navs

Self-running patch comprising two VCOs & VCAs, Maths & Wogglebug. One VCO is folded, the other modulates the TWF's Bias, WB is triggered by Maths' EOR, stepped out to pitch, envelope slopes and WB clock.

Recorded in response to Rechner7's Stockhausen-esque Noise Ring/ Pressure Points patch.

Wavefolders respond to dynamic changes, so I gated both the carrier and modulator before sending them to the TWF. This can have a dramatic effect and this patch would not have sounded the same had I gated the output post folding.

This is an example of using the TWF to achieve linear-FM-like sounds:


tbtwf_doublebass

Again, the VCO was first sent to a VCA. An envelope modules the bias, manual tweaks to envelope times and DC offset. Pure sine first, then folded.

This sort of sound is normally quite tricky to achieve via analogue FM, because of phase and tracking issues.

Here's an evolving sound featuring a sine wave some light envelope modulation of bias and manual tweaks.


tbtwf_evolve

The Triple Wave Folder has so many sweet-spots for this kind of tonal shaping and the output is clean enough so you don't need further filtering.

Lastly, here's an example of the TWF's saw to sine function:


tbtwf_saw2sine

TBTWF_saw2sine, 'scope shots PDF.

As you can hear, it does a great job. I asked Josh about the rounding of the saw evident in the 'scope shot and he confirmed that this is normal. He also explained how he achieved the panning effect in his demo: the resulting sine is 90 degrees out of phase so all you need is a multi-output LFO/ oscillator. Thanks Josh!

2 comments:

TTh said...

Awesome, Sounds. What do you mean by gating the VCO pre folding, In your first example?

Navs said...

Thanks. Rather than putting your signal directly into the TWF (at full strength) you can gate it via a VCA first. As the volume changes dynamically, so does the folding.

You can imagine it like a reverse filter: it adds harmonics depending on the signal strength. When you use a LPF, you normally change the cut off dynamically with an envelope.

You can do something similar with the TWF if you first attenuate the VCO and patch an envelope to the folder.